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Cat Vaccinations

Vaccinations allow for pre-emptive protection from diseases that can be fatal if transmitted. Vaccines work by introducing small amounts of killed or weakened antigens from a virus or bacterium into your pet. Instead of making your cat sick, they stimulate your pet’s immune system to produce antibodies, which your pet uses to fight infection if ever faced with it.

Does my indoor cat need to be vaccinated?


Cats that live indoors are not safe from what could potentially be carried in on clothes or by other animals entering the home. The Feline Leukemia virus vaccine is not necessary for indoor cats, but it is not the same case for the Rabies and upper respiratory vaccine.

What are FVRCP and core vaccines for cats?


Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus and Panleukopenia vaccine covers highly contagious and potentially fatal diseases that your cat can contract from the environment.

How often does my adult cat need to be vaccinated?


The length of time a vaccine lasts varies with the vaccine given.

Are there any risks associated with cat vaccines?


The most likely side effects you will see in your cat after vaccines are lethargy, decreased appetite and tender to touch at the injection site. More adverse effects include facial swelling, vomiting and diarrhea. If your pet seems to be having any of reaction after having vaccines, always consult our veterinarian.

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